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Thank you for visiting our Great Harbour Trawler Association (GHTA) site. The GHTA was founded in May 2002. Since that time we continue to grow each year. Our primary goals, in addition to the friendship and camaraderie, include the exchange of ideas and information that enhances the cruising life that we all enjoy. This site is available for ideas and to provide information to Great Harbour trawler owners as well as others who are interested in cruising. We offer an Associate Membership also to non-Great Harbour trawler owners who may possibly be interested in a Great Harbour trawler for their future.

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‘Guns & Goverments’ Seminar at TrawlerFest, And The Story Behind It

Let me tell you how this seminar came about. Thirty years ago, I brought a gun on a cruise to Maine because someone told me the lobstermen were armed and hostile. What an innocent age, when cruising Maine would be compared to taking a covered wagon through “Injun Country!”

Well, the lobstermen were indeed armed, and sometimes even hostile. But in the rare cases when gunfire has erupted in Downeast waters, it has been fishermen shooting at one another over territory, not at the passing sailors. I quit taking my rifle when I noticed the barrel beginning to rust.

Microsoft Word - GunsBlurbImages.docxSince then I have traveled by boat down island to the Caribbean, up the Pacific Coast and in the waters of the Middle East and Africa from Oman to Djibouiti and through the Suez Canal. As a marine journalist, I have engaged in the eternal debate over the eternal question: “To carry or not to carry?” Usually, I would argue, not, but that’s not the point with this seminar.

About 15 years ago, I met the late Paul Ward, a convivial guy, who, like me, would take on occasional delivery work. He and another sailor were taking some lawyer’s boat from Florida to the Virgin Islands, when an incident happened that would change their lives for the next two years.

Ward and his partner were anchored in a little bay on the South Coast of Puerto Rico for the night, when a they awoke to the sound of boots on deck. A SWAT team of police—a veritable everything-bagle of law enforcement—had come to call. Unbeknownst to the pair of sailors, the scumbag lawyer had an AR-15, a handgun and a pile of ammo, hidden in a secret locker. The police who had no real reason to board the vessel had hit the jackpot.

The Yankees were arrested and charged under Puerto Rican law. They pled ignorance—to no immediate avail. They faced 25 years in prison each for violations of the island’s stringent gun law. The boat’s owner tried to weasel out, but finally relented and agreed to pay for the delivery captains’ legal defense. It took two years of return visits for hearings before a Puerto Rican judge figured out a contorted way to dismiss the charges against the obviously innocent men.

Fast-forward to my involvement in TrawlerFest today. One of our most successful seminars is presented by Attorney Todd Lochner about what cruisers need to know to avoid local tax traps as they transit the East Coast of the U.S. I always like to joke that his seminar is scarier than the ones we put on about heavy weather and medical emergencies.

I remember mentioning Paul Ward’s story to him. I remember musing out loud about how many Americans realize the trouble they can get into because of a gun in a place that is almost a state. Then it occurred to me that his multi-jurisdictional approach to tax law might be worth replicating vis-à-vis the hot-button topic of guns onboard. It took some convincing since he—and later his team—would have to take a lot of time away from billable hours to create this new seminar, which we call “Guns & Governments” for short. I am grateful he agreed to take it on.

What I have made clear from the get-go is that this is not a debate about whether to carry a gun. This is a seminar for cruisers who have already made up their minds or a close to it, and now need the strategic intelligence about the various gun laws along the East Coast, the Gulf Coast and the Caribbean basin. The legal research is being shared by Lochner and his associate Gregory Singer.

Lochner, whose Annapolis firm specializes in maritime law, also recruited a small-arms expert and all-around boat guy named Steve Ross to talk about some weapons choices and maintenance issues in a saltwater environment. I’ll be making a cameo appearance to discuss some tools available to evaluate the relative security of places down island.

Captain Steve Ross grew up sailing on the Chesapeake Bay before joining the Army in 2006. After several deployments, Ross left the Army to go to St. John’s College Annapolis on the G.I. Bill. While at St. John’s, he immersed himself in the world of sailing once again racing and crewing for Captain Tony of Classic Sail Charters. He received his 50-ton Master’s license in January 2014 and started a general yacht services company, Three Sheets Yachting LLC. He is a sailmaker for Quantum Sails Annapolis and a Yacht Sales Professional at Annapolis SailYard.

Gregory Singer is an associate attorney with Lochner Law Firm, P.C.  Prior to his legal career, Mr. Singer worked and cruised extensively on yachts and tall ships on the Atlantic Coast and the Caribbean, and spent several years as a liveaboard on his classic Cheoy Lee.  Mr. Singer also served in the United States Coast Guard’s legal division in Boston, where he was a Judge Advocate Emeritus.

 


Source: PassageMaker

Campbell’s Quest: Terror At Sea (BLOG)

After four years of planning, and eight months living at anchor in the Florida Keys, Karen and I headed from Key Biscayne to Bimini, and docked at Brown’s Marina. For two days it was paradise.

We soon anchored nearby in a known, charted anchorage.

We woke in horizontal gusts of 50 knot rain. Largo’s anchor had ripped free from the bottom, which left us pitching fast toward the boats, docks, and sea planes nearby.

Largo dragged on a silt bottom over hard coral. Not even a 125-pound Mantus with all-chain rode could hold in that.

Largo dragged on a silt bottom over hard coral. Not even a 125-pound Mantus with all-chain rode could hold in that.

We say boating is 100% maintenance, 90% joy, and 10% terror, but terror was our whole world that night. The storm came fast and unpredicted. We had been holding solid since arriving in the little Bimini Harbor.

Lightning lit the deck and the collisions to come. Karen started the engines. I ran to the foredeck in biting rain, barefoot and freezing in the tropics, to winch the free-dragging anchor. It overwhelmed the windlass.

We couldn’t hear, couldn’t see. The rain shorted the headsets. We knew we were twisting toward boats, sea walls, and the shallow edges of the narrow man-made channel.

I’ve been more scared I suppose, but I don’t know when. We shouted directions and ideas back and forth. Karen kept Largo from crushing anything expensive while I got the skipping anchor off the bottom. But in keeping our 50,000-pound trawler off boats and docks, we struck the shallow edge of the man-made channel hard and grounded.

Jay and Karen celebrate again, back at Brown’s Marina after surviving a long night with no injuries or damage.

Jay and Karen celebrate again, back at Brown’s Marina after surviving a long night with no injuries or damage.

Karen rocked us free, alternating pulses of reverse thrust on the big twin engines. We finally had our bearings and hovered in the storm until sunrise, looking for a place to anchor.

At first light we could not get safe purchase in the room and conditions available (tiny anchorage, silty bottom over hard coral, other boats). At mid-day we found a marina, and were safe at dock. I dove the boat to see that our props and hull were sound. All that was wounded was our pride.

Lessons? When do you repeatedly question the bottom holding and available scope? Listen and act. We anchored with well under the proper 5:1 scope, it was not enough on the silt over coral bottom, and I should have moved on.

First time in 4 years we dragged. Our anchoring tackle is sound. Our application in this case? Not so much.

No shortcuts, folks.

Jay & Karen contribute the Fitness Afloat column in PassageMaker magazine. You can catch more of their adventures in the magazine or in the lifestyles section at www.passagemaker.com.


Source: PassageMaker

Boaters Warned About Tropical Storm Erika

The Coast Guard is issuing a caution to mariners and recreational boaters in the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico as Tropical Storm Erika nears.

“Recreational boaters and anyone conducting water-related activities should avoid areas of high surf and stay away from shoreline rocks, levees and river beds until the tropical storm passes and weather and surf conditions normalize throughout the area,” San Juan Coast Guard commander Capt. Robert Warren said in a statement.

“Monitoring the weather and understanding the dangers associated with the high sea conditions and tropical storm force winds forecasted before, during, and after the storm could save your life and property,” he said.

Predicted wind speed map.

Predicted wind speed map.

Vessels and facility operators, recreational boaters, swimmers and people conducting activities in the ocean should pay close attention and monitor this situation through updated National Weather Service advisories and take appropriate action to minimize the risks associated with these predicted conditions.

The group issued a few tips to help mariners protect themselves, their families and their vessels:

  • Do not go out to sea in a recreational boat if you know a tropical storm is approaching.
  • Contact local marinas to ask for advice about securing your vessel. Marina operators are knowledgeable and can advise you on the best methods for securing your boat.
  • Take action now. The effects of a tropical storm can be felt well in advance of the storm itself and can prevent the safe completion of preparations.
The Mariners' 1-2-3 Rule, or "Danger area", is indicated by shading. The 1-2-3 Rule, commonly taught to mariners, refers to the rounded long-term NHC forecast errors of 100-200-300 nautical miles at 24-48-72 hours, respectively. The contour defining the shaded area is constructed by accounting for those errors and then broadened further to reflect the maximum tropical storm force (34 knot) wind radii forecast at each of those times by the NHC. The NHC does not warrant that avoiding these danger areas will eliminate the risk of harm from tropical cyclones.

The Mariners’ 1-2-3 Rule, or “Danger area”, is indicated by shading. The 1-2-3 Rule, commonly taught to mariners, refers to the rounded long-term NHC forecast errors of 100-200-300 nautical miles at 24-48-72 hours, respectively. The contour defining the shaded area is constructed by accounting for those errors and then broadened further to reflect the maximum tropical storm force (34 knot) wind radii forecast at each of those times by the NHC. The NHC does not warrant that avoiding these danger areas will eliminate the risk of harm from tropical cyclones.

This post originally appeared here.


Source: PassageMaker

NOAA Embarks On Mission To Chart Bering Strait, Arctic

NOAA’s quest to better understand the world’s seafloor continues, as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has committed two of its ships, Fairweather and Rainier, to collect and update chart data in the Arctic. Along with the U.S. Coast Guard polar icebreaker, Healy, which has been recording sounding data during previous arctic research missions, and a fourth, private research vessel, the goal for NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey is to explore the potential viability of a high-traffic route from Unimak Island, in the Aleutian chain, to the Chukchi Sea, separating Asia from North America at the far end of the Bering Strait.

“Much of our charting data in this corridor is from surveys conducted a hundred years ago,” said Rear Admiral Gerd Glang, director of NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey. “So right now, we need to conduct reconnaissance of the seafloor in high-traffic areas to make sure they are safe for navigation.”

The four ships will use multibeam sonar to survey seafloor depths over 3,200 feet apart and equally as wide. The end result will be a near total of 12,000 miles of data collected from the 4-mile-wide Bering Strait.

In addition to collecting depth soundings, the ships will also be seeking hazards to navigation, in the form of seamounts or other dangers. As a side mission, Rainier will be further investigating Point Hope, Alaska, to verify the existence of a shoal area discovered by NOAA’s cartographers after an analysis of satellite imagery.


Source: PassageMaker