Great Harbour Trawler Association

Featured

Thank you for visiting our Great Harbour Trawler Association (GHTA) site. The GHTA was founded in May 2002. Since that time we continue to grow each year. Our primary goals, in addition to the friendship and camaraderie, include the exchange of ideas and information that enhances the cruising life that we all enjoy. This site is available for ideas and to provide information to Great Harbour trawler owners as well as others who are interested in cruising. We offer an Associate Membership also to non-Great Harbour trawler owners who may possibly be interested in a Great Harbour trawler for their future.

Member Log In

Great Harbour Trawlers For Sale

GHTA Forum

GHTA Membership

GHTA Officers

GHTA Mailing List

Club Documents (Members Only. You must be logged in to view our Club documents)

Update user Profile

Sequel On The ICW: When A Buoy Becomes A Man (BLOG/VIDEO)

Today was a long day. Which was surprising, as we just ran east along Long Island Sound. Simple – but not so. And yet, it was an awesome day!

Day 17 – Oyster Bay, NY to Sag Harbor, NY, 76 miles. 4 hours 15 min

Let me just marvel on that for a moment.

Wow.

Amy and I have been on Sequel for twenty nights – living on this little triangle of floating space for twenty two days. Shouldn’t we be freaking out by now? Straining at the perimeter of this relatively small space for our own individual spaces? If Sequel was a strip of land paced off at forty feet by thirteen and a half, perhaps. But our footprint is so much larger than the cubic feet of water we occupy at any one time. I suppose our space is more defined by the spread of our wake as we travel through this experience. Without waxing too poetic, I suppose our footprint is infinite and therefore that’s why we are so happy within it.

Right – well, the wind has been screaming around Sequel all afternoon. We’re in Sag Harbor at a mooring, with a crescent moon shining over us and the glow of at least twenty megayachts shining along the docks a quarter mile away. We’ve double run the mooring lines with this wind, and are happily living within the security of Sequel (with one of us tucked into bed and the other one writing this blog – eh hem, Amy…). But that reminds me of last night – and of the title of this post.

When a buoy becomes a man, aka – the haunting of John…

Last night – at Oyster Bay – was another wicked windy one. And another night at a mooring (we do love a good mooring!). We had climbed into bed, with the slapping and gurgling and bouncing and jinking that I love so much while free floating at a mooring. My eyes were closed and the blissful peace of sleep descending on me like a blanket. Ah…

TAP tap tap TAP!!!!!!!!!

WTF???

TAP TAP TAP!!!!!!!!

Damn it all to hell. The buoy that’s tied to the large pennant lines run from the mooring – the buoy that makes picking up a mooring so much easier – was floating beside the bow of Sequel, it’s long fiberglass rod politely knocking on the hull for attention. Ugh.

I crawl out of bed, slide open the door from the stateroom, stumble through the saloon and up the companionway steps. Slide open the hatch and fold open the door. Stagger across the helm deck, unzip the door to the cockpit and creep around the side deck and work my way up to the bow.

Damn buoy.

I drag it up onto the deck. Problem solved. I work my way back through the Get Smart maze of obstacles and back into bed, feeling a little proud of myself. Eyes closed I drift off…

CAH—RASH!!!!!

The buoy is dragged off the bow (just beyond my resting head) and into the water – hitting every noisemaking protrusion on a fairly protrusion-laden bow.

AAARGH!!!!!

I look at my phone – 11:00pm. Sleep John, sleep.

TAP TAP TAP TAP!!!!!!!

AAARGH!!!! (!!!)

Up I get – back through the sleep-deprived obstacle course and out to the bow. I’ll teach it – I’ll let out more line and get it away from the side of our hull. Hah!

Back to bed. Ahhh…

ding

DING!

DING DING DING DING!!!!!!!

The stupid thing was now ringing our anchor (a rather nice 35-lb. CQR anchor on 25 feet of chain and 400 feet of rode, but I digress). UP, OUT, CURSE, MORE SCOPE LET OUT, BED!

(ding)

ding

DING DING DING TAP TAP DING TAP!!!!!

Holy crap! I’m up – laughing. Crying. Swearing. Contemplating just casting the entire cursed thing off and letting Sequel drift into the world at her whim.

But I also knew what I had to do – what I always needed to do. I had to set up the mooring lines properly, which we didn’t do from the get go because someone previously had tied the two large pennants together with the pickup line and we didn’t fix the issue when we picked up the mooring. When I resolved it – it was now just after 3:00 in the morning – and crawled back into bed, I smiled. The buoy knew it needed to be fully on our deck and it wouldn’t rest until it got there.

It won, and it got a good night’s rest, as did I, eventually…

You can read more from John here


Source: PassageMaker

Foggy, Brooklin Boat Yard Builds An Artful Automated Sloop (BLOG)

Written by Ben Ellison for Panbo, The Marine Electronics Hub



Maine is rightfully well known for boatbuilding but the craft was largely dormant when I got here in the early 70’s, and it stayed that way for quite a while. In the late 80’s many of the talented builders I worked with at WoodenBoat School were doing repairs and restorations. A commission for most anything larger than a sailing skiff was a big deal. But wow, did that change. It’s been wonderful to witness remarkably crafted custom vessels launch at yards like Lyman Morse (now also in Camden!), Rockport Marine, and Hodgdon Yachts to name a few. In fact, I only learned on June 20th that Brooklin Boat Yard — already masters at composite “Spirit of Tradition” beauties — were working on the extraordinary sloop above.

FOGGY_2_at_BBY_6-2015_cPanbo.jpgMeet Foggy, just launched on June 15th and still being finished out. What you can’t see in my photos is how the 74 foot yacht’s red carbon mast towers about 104 feet above the water while her 19,000 pound bulb keel draws nearly 12.5 feet. What’s obvious, though, is the huge foam-cored and cambered teak deck and the bright topsides layer of her Western Larch, Western Cedar, and carbon fiber composite hull. Not to mention the, um, random-seeming clusters of embedded glass in both those surfaces.

FOGGY_skylight_daylight_cPanbo.jpgIndeed, Foggy has some 862 embedded chunks of carbon-reinforced glass forming two skylights and eight “daylights” (as apparently dubbed by the builders). Note how at least the top layer of the deck and topsides has often been bent or sawn to flow with the glass designs. And that, I suspect, is only one aspect of the boatbuilding challenges BBY encountered in this project. Are you beginning to think, as I do, that this is possibly the most unusual new sailboat anywhere?

Flipping_Foggy_courtesy_Autoliterate_aPanbo.jpgSo how did a boatnut who only lives about 25 miles away (by water) not hear about this project? It’s not just that remarkable boatbuilding has become nearly commonplace around here; Foggy also seems veiled in secrecy. The otherwise informative Brooklin Boat Yard site doesn’t mention her, and the most detailed specifications I’ve found so far were in the local Ellsworth American‘s launch coverage, which also noted that BBY could not identify the owner. But it’s hard to keep secrets in the days of blogs, social media, and Google (not to mention the free press). Autoliterate, for instance, truly is a literate blog mostly about great old cars and trucks, but the Brooklin-based author also neatly captured the June 2014 flipping of Foggy’s hull (his photo above).

Flipping_Foggy_interior_courtesy_Autoliterate_aPanbo.JPGThis is another autoliterate image from flipping day, but I flipped the photo so as to more easily imagine what the daylight will feel like on the finished yacht. I’m pretty sure that this area is what reporter Stephen Rappaport described as the “large master stateroom forward” so there’s also a large skylight above (as seen in the top photo). I’m picturing water dancing by the lower glass in feisty sailing conditions and light dancing around the cabin in all sorts of conditions. Then at night, when Foggy is lit on the inside, there will be that arty jack-o-lantern effect Rappaport mentioned in the Ellsworth paper. Note, too, how the hull is mostly a finished visible surface inside as well as out (the deck, too) so there are few places to hide cables, plumbing, etc. Challenging!

Foggy_Frers_74_courtesy_dwhatty_Trawler_Forum_aPanbo.jpgThe light effects will be similar in the huge main cabin shown here under construction in a photo posted in the Trawler Forum, and I imagine they will be spectacular. And no wonder, given that the stellar architect Frank Gehry apparently designed the embedded glass details though German Frers is credited with the overall boat design. What’s less obvious is that Gehry was apparently designing spaces he himself hopes to sail in, but then again Foggy is also the name of the Benetau First 44.7 owned by Frank Owen Gehry (FOG) back in 2009 according to this sharp NYT piece on sailing architects.

Rendering_of_Frers_74_Yacht_Foggy_aPanbo.jpgIn that Times article Gehry said, “I love the sails. They make an architectural space. The Disney Hall is wing-in-wing.” I sure hope to see Foggy sailing in Maine this summer and many of you may also get to if she does indeed sail around via Panama to her home port of Playa Del Rey, CA (as Rappaport also reported).

Foggy_rendering_courtesy_Autoliterate_aPanbo.jpgI’d also like to know more about her systems. According to MegaYacht News, those batteries seen in the main cabin photo above are part of Li-Ion 10 pack that will be charged by a 10kW gen set, and purportedly many of the sail controls are hydraulic. In the rendering above (thanks again, autoliterate) the clean deck theme is paramount…

FOGGY_at_BBY_6-2015_cockpit_detail_cPanbo.jpg…and you can see some of the push button panels in this cockpit photo, as well as how many control lines are run somewhere under the deck. Incidentally, I took these photos from Gizmo during my annual one day WBS nav class job; I was more than willing to stop by Center Harbor to have a look once Jane Ahfeld and the students gushed about the launching. But I remain reluctant to bug the good folks at BBY for more info on the boat’s gear until it seems like they are free to discuss her. I did, though, come across this terrific video covering Foggy’s early construction. Steve White says the project took BBY’s (already stunning) craftsmanship “up to another notch” and who can doubt that?

Foggy_BBY_video_clip_courtesy_BBY_n_Billy_Black_aPanbo.jpg

At any rate, it feels right to honor Maine boatbuilding on this Fourth of July celebration of our country’s independence, but of course I wish Panbo readers all across this land a great holiday. I assure you that Gizmo is showing the flag(s).

Gizmo_4th_of_July_2015_cPanbo.jpg

Click here to read comments about this Panbo entry, or add your own.


Source: PassageMaker

Foggy, Brooklin Boat Yard builds an artful automated sloop

Written for Panbo by Ben Ellison

FOGGY_at_BBY_6-2015_cPanbo.jpgMaine is rightfully well known for boatbuilding but the craft was largely dormant when I got here in the early 70’s, and it stayed that way for quite a while. In the late 80’s many of the talented builders I worked with at WoodenBoat School were doing repairs and restorations. A commission for most anything larger than a sailing skiff was a big deal. But wow, did that change. It’s been wonderful to witness remarkably crafted custom vessels launch at yards like Lyman Morse (now also in Camden!), Rockport Marine, and Hodgdon Yachts to name a few. In fact, I only learned on June 20th that Brooklin Boat Yard — already masters at composite “Spirit of Tradition” beauties — were working on the extraordinary sloop above…


Source: Yahoo Pipe

Tomorrow: Valley Palooza Floating Party, AICW south of Jacksonville, FL

If you plan to be on the water between Ponte Vedra Beach and St. Augustine, slow down and keep a sharp watch! No specific location is indicated for the float party other than the Palm Valley Bridge launch site, see below. To read more of this story from the Jacksonvile Times Union by Amanda Williamson, click here.

.
Planned Palm Valley party on Intracoastal prompts excitement, concern
By Amanda Williamson Fri, Jul 3, 2015 @ 10:18 pm | updated Sat, Jul 4, 2015 @ 9:19 am

Palm Valley residents want to throw a floating neighborhood party — complete with makeshift rafts, inflatable tubes and floating coolers — on a skinny stretch of the Intracoastal Waterway the day after the Fourth of July.
Palm Valley residents want to throw a floating neighborhood party — complete with makeshift rafts, inflatable tubes and floating coolers — on a skinny stretch of the Intracoastal Waterway the day after the Fourth of July, one of the busiest boating weekends of the year.
What could go wrong?

The Coast Guard seems to think a lot.

The law enforcement agency dubbed Valley Palooza, which encourages friends and families to celebrate the holiday weekend floating lazily down the waterway, the equivalent of a “flash mob.”

With more than 2,000 people invited to attend, the Palooza’s social media page generated a lot of excitement in the month since its inception. It has, however, also raised concerns with community members and law enforcement.

Already, Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville plans, alongside local and state law enforcement agencies, to ensure boats are on scene to mitigate any potential risks, said Commander Alisa Praskovich, chief of the prevention department.

“If, given the sheer number of people, the waterway becomes clogged or it threatens the safety, then the Coast Guard would have the full jurisdiction to respond,” she said. “Truthfully, the greatest risk, presuming alcohol, would be a possible search and rescue. When you have that many people in the water, it can impede travel.”

Amanda Williamson

Click Here To View the Eastern Florida Cruisers’ Net Anchorage Directory Listing For Palm Valley Bridge

Click Here To Open A Chart View Window, Zoomed To the Location of Palm Valley Bridge


Source: Yahoo Pipe