Great Harbour Trawler Association


Thank you for visiting our Great Harbour Trawler Association (GHTA) site. The GHTA was founded in May 2002. Since that time we continue to grow each year. Our primary goals, in addition to the friendship and camaraderie, include the exchange of ideas and information that enhances the cruising life that we all enjoy. This site is available for ideas and to provide information to Great Harbour trawler owners as well as others who are interested in cruising. We offer an Associate Membership also to non-Great Harbour trawler owners who may possibly be interested in a Great Harbour trawler for their future.

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Hauling and Blocking a Great Harbour 47

Hauling and Blocking a Great Harbour 47

Disclaimer – this has been written by Henry Dennig from comments I have collected from various owners.  I do not have any engineering background.  I would recommend anyone having their boat hauled and blocked, should discuss this event with Ken Fickett before having it done.  If you have any suggestions or comments on this post, please let me know – hjd




When hauling a Great Harbour 47, the slings should be aligned with the internal structural walls.   The aft lifting point is salon/engine room wall, which is forward of the salon windows, and before the port light.

The forward lifting point is the forward berth wall.   Directly forward of the bathroom / office port light.  Below the pilot house doors.

Ideally the boat should be lifted with four lifting straps to spread the weight but can be lifted with a travel lift using two straps.

The boat does not have stabilizers, nor spray rails.



The Great Harbour 47 does NOT have a keel.  The weight of the boat must be supported around the edge of the boat.   Each side of the boat should have five blocks/jack stands.  If jack stands are used, they must be chained.

A blocking under the transom and bow can be done after the sides are supported.


Photos of past hauling and blocking




Preferred lifting with four straps

Forward Straps


Forward Slings

Forward strap at the front of pilot house

Rear strap in front of ladder door

Aft Straps

Aft Slings

Front strap in front of salon window

Rear strap in front of engine exhaust


Bow thruster battery bank

Our bow thruster battery bank consists of two 12 volt AGM
start/deep-cycle batteries. Monitoring the charge state of the these
batteries under the bed is a pain in the neck. To ease the problem, I
recently made and installed a battery monitor such that the voltage
and charging current of each battery quickly can be monitored without
taking the mattress and hatch covers off. If anyone is interested in
installing one of these please contact me for details.

A related issue was the negative terminal on the port battery. This
terminal suffered a partial meltdown due to a loose connection in July
2010.  A repair allowed continued operation without battery
replacement. Unfortunately, during installation of the battery
monitor, a crack was observed across the face of the terminal. When I
wiggled it, the terminal broke off nearly flush with the top of the
case. Although the battery is old, considering the cost of a new
battery, a repair attempt seemed worthwhile. The repair worked – a new
terminal was successfully cast onto the old terminal stub. A load test
with the bow thruster confirmed that operation of the new terminal
under heavy load current is satisfactory. Please contact me if you
need details on the battery terminal repair procedure.

John Reynolds

Port Battery Terminal Batt Terminal Battery Monitor