The Great Harbour (PassageMaker)

Story by Bill Parlatore on 

When you want something bad enough, chances are you’ll find a way to get it or make it happen. It’s that way with life, and it’s the same with boats. If you really want a particular boat, I mean really want a particular boat, other things will fall by the wayside and other priorities changed to accommodate getting that boat.

Perhaps that is a good way to begin our story about the Great Harbour 37.

Gary and Sue Danielson live in Michigan, St. Clair Shores to be exact. The husband and wife team are professional people, accustomed to living the good life in a dynamic suburb of Detroit. They are like many other professionals in the world today: Gary has a law practice, and Sue is a nurse. They seem quite normal enough; normal, that is, until you start talking to them about boats…

You see, a few years back, Gary and Sue were world cruising aboard the small 25-foot Erickson sailboat, Moon Boots, twice transatlantic, living among fellow travelers on the French canals, and enjoying a life that only cruisers can understand. They savored the adventure of cruising, and the freedom a small boat offered-even if the layout was narrow and confining. Youth is like that-it’s truly amazing what we can live with at a younger age.

They had the champagne life on a beer budget… more of us should learn how to do that!

more….

Nobeltec TimeZero Trident

Nobeltec has introduced some new software, TimeZero Trident. Anybody have any initial impressions to share?

Nobeltec’s TimeZero Trident is the most dynamic, cutting-edge PC-based navigation software available. Built on the innovative TimeZero chart engine, Trident offers a completely new, sophisticated user interface designed to be extremely intuitive and easy to use. The chart engine redraws charts seamlessly allowing users to easily zoom, pan, change chart display modes, and perform other chart handling functions without limited range presets.

TimeZero Trident incorporates a whole new dimension into chart presentation with full time 3D chart rendering. Users can choose a 2D top-down view of the navigation chart for a look and feel that duplicates traditional chart plotting presentation. Or, users can choose to pan and zoom the chart to any angle at any range scale instantly. There is no limited “3D mode” because Nobeltec TimeZero Trident operates in a true 3D environment at all times.

Trident uses MapMedia 3D charts and users have the opportunity to choose which data they prefer from multiple chart sources in the MM3D format. The options within the MapMedia data include official S-57 vector and raster charts from hydrographic offices around the world, as well as vector charts from C-MAP by Jeppesen and DataCore by Navionics.

Trident supports Nobeltec InSight radars and the best of class Furuno FAR2XX7 radar making it ideal for light commercial and workboat users who want to optimize radar integration. Trident also integrates with Furuno’s entire DRS radar line, the FA30 and FA50 AIS units, DFF1 and DFF3 black box sounders, NavNet3D chart plotters, standard NMEA 0183 navigation sensors, and NMEA 2000 networks.

A Brief History of the U.S. Navy Jack

In the fall of 1775, as the first ships of the Continental Navy readied in the Delaware River, Commodore Esek Hopkins issued a set of fleet signals. Among these signals was an instruction directing his vessels to fly a striped Jack and Ensign at their proper places. The custom of the jack-type flag had originated with the Royal Navy in the 15th century or earlier; such was the likely source of Hopkins’ inspiration. This first U.S. Navy Jack has traditionally been shown as consisting of 13 horizontal alternating red and white stripes with a superimposed rattlesnake and the motto “Don’t Tread on Me.” The rattlesnake had long been a symbol of resistance to British repressive acts in Colonial America; its display on the new jack of the fledging Continental Navy fit naturally with the fervor of the times.

According to Dr. Whitney Smith of the Flag Research Center, the traditional design of the First Navy Jack has never been accurately determined. Historians inferred the design from Hopkins’ message and a color plate depicting a slightly different “Don’t Tread Upon Me” flag used as a Navy Ensign in Admiral George Henry Preble’s 1880 book, History of the Flag of the United States. Historians’ widely copied Preble’s rare color plate, thus providing the probable source of the traditional design of the First Navy Jack.

The first U.S. Navy use of the Union Jack (a flag replicating the canton i.e. white stars on a blue field of the U.S. Flag) probably occurred soon after the adoption of the First Stars and Stripes Law on June 14, 1777. The First Stars and Stripes Law stated that the Flag of the United States be 13 stripes alternating red and white and that the union be 13 white stars in a blue field representing a new constellation. Although the date of introduction of the Union Jack is not precisely known, a 1785 engraving of the frigate USS Philadelphia clearly depicts the Union Jack flying from her jackstaff.

As the number of states increased, the Union Jack was altered to conform to the canton of the national flag. General orders were issued from time to time by the Navy Department when a change in the number of stars was necessary.

Navy Regulations, first promulgated in 1865, prescribed the use of the jack. It is displayed daily from the jackstaff of all U.S. naval vessels in commission, from 8 a.m. to sunset while the ship is at anchor. Additionally it is flown to indicate a court martial is in progress, and as the President’s and Secretary of the Navy’s personal flag.

There have been a few where instances where the traditional First Navy Jack has been used in lieu of the Union Jack:

  1. In 1975, the Secretary of the Navy directed that the First Navy Jack be flown in 1975 and 1976 in lieu of the Union Jack during the United States Bicentennial Year as a colorful and historic reminder of the nation’s and the Navy’s origin.
  2. In August 1977 (the date is sometimes mistakenly (?) given as 1980 or even 1981), the Secretary of the Navy specified that the ship with the longest total period of active service display the First Navy Jack until decommissioned or transferred to inactive service, at which time the flag shall be passed to the next ship in line with appropriate honors. Here are ships that have had this honor:
    • The USS Mauna Kea (AE 22). The Mauna Kea was commissioned commissioned March 30, 1957. It was decommissioned June 30, 1995.
    • The USS Prairie (AD 15). The Prairie was commissioned on August 5, 1940. It was decommissioned March 26, 1993.
  3. On June 3, 1999, the Secretary of the Navy authorized submarines and submarine tenders to fly a special Submarine Centennial Jack throughout the year 2000 in honor of the U. S. Submarine Force’s Centennial. This marks the first occasion since 1775 that a specific class of ships has been so honored.
  4. On May 22, 2002, the U.S. Navy ordered all ships to display the First Navy Jack during the War on Terrorism.

The Best Sunscreens

The best sunscreen is a hat and a shirt. No chemicals to absorb through the skin, no questions about whether they work. But when you can’t get away from exposing your skin to the sun, use EWG’s top-rated sunscreens to provide broad-spectrum (UVA and UVB-sunburn) protection with fewer hazardous chemicals that penetrate the skin. Sunscreen and sunblock makers are awaiting FDA approval for a wider selection of UVA-blocking chemicals. In the meantime, all top-rated products contain either zinc or titanium minerals to help cut UVA exposures for sunscreen users.

Choose from among our top-rated sunscreens for broad spectrum protection with fewer hazardous ingredients. And follow our sun safety tips to protect your skin for a lifetime.

Click here for a list of the best rated sunscreens